Understanding Supplementary Angles | Definition, Properties, and Examples

Definition of Supplementary Angles

Supplementary angles are a pair of angles that add up to 180 degrees

Supplementary angles are a pair of angles that add up to 180 degrees. In other words, if two angles are supplementary, the sum of their measures is equal to 180 degrees.

When two lines intersect each other, they form four angles. If two angles formed by this intersection are supplementary, they are called supplementary angles. These angles can be adjacent, meaning they share a common side and vertex, or they can be opposite angles, which are formed by two pairs of intersecting lines.

For example, let’s consider two angles, angle A and angle B. If the measure of angle A is 90 degrees, then angle B would have to be 90 degrees as well, as they add up to 180 degrees. In this case, angle A and angle B are supplementary.

Supplementary angles have a special property. If two angles are supplementary to the same angle, then they are congruent (have equal measures). This property is known as the congruent supplements theorem.

In summary, supplementary angles are a pair of angles that add up to 180 degrees. They can be adjacent or opposite angles, and if two angles are supplementary to the same angle, they are congruent.

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