Understanding Obtuse Angles: Definition, Examples, and Applications

obtuse angle

An obtuse angle is an angle that measures greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees

An obtuse angle is an angle that measures greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees. In other words, it is an angle that is larger than a right angle but smaller than a straight angle.

To understand an obtuse angle, let’s consider a protractor. A protractor is a tool that is used to measure angles. It has a semi-circular shape with markings ranging from 0 degrees to 180 degrees. When you place the protractor on a straight line or any other reference line, the 0 degree mark corresponds to a right angle (90 degrees) and the 180 degree mark corresponds to a straight angle (180 degrees).

Now, if you measure an angle with a protractor and find that it is greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees, then it is an obtuse angle. The boundary between a right angle and an obtuse angle is 90 degrees, while the boundary between an obtuse angle and a straight angle is 180 degrees.

For example, let’s say you measure an angle and find that it measures 120 degrees. Since it is greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees, it is an obtuse angle.

Obtuse angles can be commonly found in many real-life situations. For instance, when you open a book slightly and look at the angle formed between the two pages, it can be an obtuse angle. Similarly, if you open a door partially and measure the angle formed between the opened door and the closed doorframe, it can also be an obtuse angle.

It is important to note that an obtuse angle is different from a reflex angle, which measures greater than 180 degrees but less than 360 degrees. An obtuse angle strictly falls between a right angle and a straight angle.

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