Why the derivative of a constant function is always zero | Explained with math

derivative of a constant, f(x)=45

The derivative of a constant is always zero

The derivative of a constant is always zero. In this case, since the function f(x) is defined as f(x) = 45, the derivative of f(x) with respect to x would be zero. Mathematically, it can be written as:

f'(x) = 0

This is because the derivative of a constant function is independent of x and only measures the rate of change of the function. Since a constant does not change, its rate of change is zero.

In other words, no matter what value of x you choose, the derivative of a constant function will always be zero. This concept is important in calculus as it helps us to study how functions change and relate to each other.

More Answers:
The Chain Rule | Calculating the Derivative of sin(x) using the Chain Rule of Differentiation
Understanding the Power Rule | Finding the Derivative of a Single Variable Function f(x) = 2x
The Power Rule in Calculus | How to Find the Derivative of a Polynomial Function

Error 403 The request cannot be completed because you have exceeded your quota. : quotaExceeded

Share:

Recent Posts

Don't Miss Out! Sign Up Now!

Sign up now to get started for free!