Understanding the Integration of sin(x) and Applying Basic Integration Rules

int sin(x) dx

To integrate the function sin(x) with respect to x, we can use the basic integration rules

To integrate the function sin(x) with respect to x, we can use the basic integration rules.

The integral of sin(x) can be found as:

∫ sin(x) dx = -cos(x) + C

Where C is the constant of integration.

This result comes from the fact that the derivative of -cos(x) with respect to x is sin(x), as per the derivative of cosine function being the negative sine function. Therefore, taking the anti-derivative, or integral, of sin(x) will give us -cos(x), up to the constant term.

So, the final answer to ∫ sin(x) dx is -cos(x) + C, where C is a constant.

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